leg irons

  n.
   -pl. a pair of ringlike fetters, connected by a short chain or straight member, designed to be locked about the ankle

Locksmith dictionary . 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • leg irons — n [plural] metal chains that are put around a prisoner s legs …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • leg irons — leg ,irons noun plural two metal rings or chains that are fitted around a prisoner s legs to prevent them from running away …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • leg irons — UK US noun [plural] two metal rings or chains that are fitted around a prisoner’s legs to prevent them from running away Thesaurus: relating to prison lifehyponym …   Useful english dictionary

  • leg irons — noun A fetter or shackle attached at the ankle …   Wiktionary

  • leg irons — noun (plural) metal circles or chains that are put around a prisoner s legs …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • leg irons — UK / US noun [plural] two metal rings or chains that are fitted around a prisoner s legs to prevent them from running away …   English dictionary

  • leg-iron — ˈ ̷ ̷ˌ ̷ ̷ ̷ ̷ noun : a shackle for the leg no … handcuffs, shackles, or leg irons could hold him Walter Gibson * * * legˈ iron noun A fetter for the leg • • • Main Entry: ↑leg …   Useful english dictionary

  • Jack Sheppard — (4 March 1702 – 16 November 1724) was a notorious English robber, burglar and thief of early 18th century London. Born into a poor family, he was apprenticed as a carpenter but took to theft and burglary in 1723, with little more than a year of… …   Wikipedia

  • Fetters — Fetters, shackles, footcuffs or leg irons are a kind of physical restraint used on the feet or ankles to allow walking but prevent running and kicking. The term fetter shares a root with the word foot .In humans, typically only prisoners or… …   Wikipedia

  • Marshalsea — The prison occupied two locations, the first c. 1329–1811, and the second 1811–1842. The image above is of the first Marshalsea in the 18th century …   Wikipedia

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